Tag Archives: Long Island

Gil on “Kids in the House” shares his opinion on DIR/Floortime VS. ABA

15 Jun

This is a clip from a panel I did on the website, “Kids in the House.” During the panel discussion, I got tossed a question about what intervention for Autism I would recommend. I don’t think they were prepared for how enthusiastically I would support DIR/Floortime and Stanley Greenspan. The other 2 panelists wanted to defend the ABA model. You can see the whole 30 minutes at the Kids in the House website through the link below. The part I posted actually gives you the whole idea, though.

If you come to see me at the Summer Autism Institute for the State of Vermont where I will be keynoting Friday, June 26th (http://www.uvm.edu/cnhs/autism_institute/) or Autism Society International Conference in Denver in July (http://www.uvm.edu/cnhs/autism_institute/) or at United States Autism and Aspergers Association in Tucson at the end of July (http://www.usautism.org/conferences/) you should probably know by know that I am going to talk about the parent supportive, respectful, effective DIR/Floortime and Rebecca School.

http://www.kidsinthehouse.com/blogs/kids-in-the-house/autism-discussion-raising-a-child-with-special-needs

Gil Tippy and Christopher Gauthier at USAAA

19 Dec

This is a snippet of an hour long public talk Christopher Gauthier and I gave at the United States Autism and Asperger Association national conference in Kansas City this Fall. USAAA just put this up on line, it had originally gone out live on a live feed from the conference, and I was really pleased to be able to link to it. USAAA is a very cool group, dedicated to finding sensible answers to dietary, biological and intervention questions for the Autism and Asperger community. I am always delighted to be asked to participate. This year I got to sample (and by sample I mean I ate every meal!) Kansas City barbeque. I also got to spend time with Chris Gauthier, the immensely talented photographer and inspiring activist. He and his wife Jacqui are the kind of friends who you dearly want to spend more time with, but somehow cannot make all the busy schedules work to get together. We all have these friends, and the Gauthiers are mine. I console myself by having access to Chris’ work, and by these annual conferences where we get to touch base once again. Maybe now that I am part time on the west coast, in Santa Rosa, CA, so that the distance between the Gauthiers and the Tippy’s is shorter, we can finally make our visits more regular. Check out Chris’ work at the link above, and notice the gallery of pictures we are sitting in front of on stage at USAAA. They are also Chris’s work.

Gil Tippy and Rae Leeper at ICDL International Conference

12 Nov

 

Rae and I got a chance to present at the Interdisciplinary Council for Development and Learning’s (ICDL) International Conference on 11/9/14. We presented on the way that a DIR/Floortime curriculum meets the requirements of the Common Core Standards, is relatively easy to do, and is very effective with kids on the Autism Spectrum. The work is from the Rebecca School in Manhattan, where I am the Clinical Director and one of the Founders, and Rae is the Educational Coordinator, and also a founding member of the faculty at the school. This is really a teaser, and if people want to see the entire thing I would be happy to put it together in small segments. You could contact Rae at the Rebecca School, or me through my blog or website. We were really happy to be so well received by the audience. We think this is the answer for how to meet the Common Core Standards for kids with developmental challenges, and for neurotypical students as well. Good developmental work is simply right in many different situations.

Gil at the International Symposium for Contemplative Studies

4 Nov

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Singer

Tania Singer, PhD

The Dalai Lama Speaks at the Conference

The Dalai Lama Speaks at the Conference

I am still so blown away after four amazing days at the Mind and Life International Symposium for Contemplative Studies. In meeting after meeting, from the dialog with His Holiness, the Dalai Lama, though the amazing closing presentation by Tania Singer, PhD, who electrified the audience with her amazing research at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, it was the most amazing conference I have ever been a part of. I presented a poster

Rebecca School's Mindfulness Group Poster

Rebecca School’s Mindfulness Group Poster

At the Symposium in front of Rebecca School's poster.

At the Symposium in front of Rebecca School’s poster.

about the Mindfulness Support Group I run at the Rebecca School. Arianna Huffington was wonderful, and remarkably funny and mindful at the banquet on Saturday night. But the really amazing part for me were the presentations and the practice support. I had the chance to meditate, several times, with Roshi Joan Halifax, John Kabat-Zinn, and Sharon Salzburg. One of the meditations I attended with Sharon Salzberg, along with the closing address by Tania Singer inspired me to take our simple meditation group in a direction which I hope will directly influence our work with the kids and families at the Rebecca School. All in all, an entirely amazing and life affirming four days!

Arianna Huffington

Arianna Huffington

Sharon Salzberg

Sharon Salzberg

John Kabat-Zinn

Roshi Joan Halifax

Roshi Joan Halifax

The Common Core Standards are Right, and RTI Won’t Work

14 Jul

 

This is part of a presentation I gave with my friend, Rae Leeper, at the YAI International Convention in NYC this year. The Common Core Curriculum is the right way to go for all kids, and especially for kids with developmental challenges of relating and communicating. The way behaviorists work with these kids, Response to Intervention (RTI) worked alright with the memory based No Child Left Behind, (which left everyone behind), but does not work at all with the Common Core Standards. Behaviorists are left doing an ineffective intervention faster and faster to try to meet the Common Core Standards, but they cannot do it. I predict that in two years everyone will be clamoring to do our brand of respectful, developmental, individualized, child centered intervention and teaching.

Dr. Tippy Won’t Do That

19 Jun

 

This is little piece of a case conference I ran at the Rebecca School a couple of weeks ago. These weekly conferences include the team working with the child, the parents, and the entire 120 person staff of the school. The team talks about their program and the rest of the staff and I offer suggestions to make the program better. This clip is me talking about a child who loves the tiny details of a small locking block set, and a particular type of train set, and how he can see the trees but not the forest. I tell the staff to throw out all the tiny detailed stuff in order to invite the child into the world. I also talk about the tiny frustrations that lead to every child, not neurotypical and neurotypical alike, to be able to tolerate frustration and the challenges of the everyday world. Children beginning to understand that they have the inner resources to handle challenges is what leads to children seeing challenges as interesting problems to be solved, as opposed to seeing them as insurmountable frustrations to be controlled by rigidly sticking to set patterns.

ABA Detox, Part 5

28 May

 

This is Part 5 of a lecture I gave at Rebecca School about ABA Detox, the term we coined to talk about the difficulties children who have had a lot of ABA treatment sometimes have when they get into a respectful, appropriate developmental setting. I get a chance to talk briefly about language, and when children start talking as they move up developmentally. It is touching to me, that when I pause in the lecture and turn to the audience, that they all know that there are three words every parent wants to hear from their child.

ABA Detox, Part 4

9 May

 

This is part 4 of a lecture I gave at the Rebecca School in which I talked about the detox from applied behavior analytic treatment. The difficulty thinking that we see in kids is the side effect of a commonly applied treatment. Behavioral, memory based education, for any kid, causes trouble thinking. This is why the Common Core Standards are causing such troubles. They are thinking based standards, and are in fact what we need to teach, but our entire education system, for kids neurotypical, and neurodiverse, has been wrong-headedly memory and behaviorally based. ABA treatment causes problems for kids who get it, and this lecture, with my Pop Corn Treatment suggestion, talks about one way in which we try to help kids find their thinking selves.

ABA Detox, Part 3

5 May

This is part three of a lecture I gave at the Rebecca School talking about “ABA Detox.” This is the process of moving from a world where you are told what to do at every minute, to a world where people respect your thought and your intention, and give you some freedom. Kids in this circumstance have trouble even recognizing that they have a thought, never mind that they have a right to act on the thought!

ABA Detox, How to Help Kids with ASD Get Over ABA, Part 2

28 Apr

Here is the second part of a training I did at the Rebecca School, as a prologue to a case presentation on a kid who came to our school, and then was struggling as a result of what we call “ABA Detox.” This is the state of affairs where a kid who has become used to being told, “prompted”, about everything all day long becomes paralyzed and anxious when he is given the freedom to think. Kids detoxing from ABA don’t recognize that they have a right to have a thought, or they don’t even recognize that they have a thought on which they could act.

In this second part of the training, I talk about why parents go along with ABA, despite their misgivings, and then, finally leave ABA for more developmentally appropriate, effective, respectful treatment.

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