Tag Archives: Floortime

“For On The Floor” #4, Folding Laundry

26 Mar

In this video I offer my very latest thinking on Next/Gen developmental education while folding laundry. In about 4 minutes, I try to teach a fundamental principle for developmental interventions. It is a sophisticated lesson that I would only teach to the most advanced DIRFloortime® practitioners, or parents, who are the experts on their child.

How a Behavioral Intervention Might Impede Progress in Autism

11 Dec

This is part of a presentation I gave at theInterdisciplinary Counsel for Development and Learning, ICDL’s, International Conference in San Francisco this year. In it I explain why punishing, or prompting or working behaviorally in general, sets back the development of the person on the receiving end of the intervention. I explain in detail a graph I use to teach therapists and families why they should not mix an applied behavioral intervention with a DIRFloortime® intervention.

The “Glinda Strategy”

3 Dec

 

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This is a brief clip, from the end of my presentation at the Interdisciplinary Council for Development and Learning’s 2019 International Conference in San Francisco. It starts on a slide of a chapter I just published in the book, “Autism 360°.”

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I wanted to empower therapists and parents to advocate vigorously whenever they see people misrepresenting which interventions have rigorous data over a long time that supports their interventions. I called it “The Glinda Strategy” in honor of everyone’s favorite good witch, Glinda, from the”Wizard of Oz.” Click on the cc at the bottom of the video to turn on the Closed Captioning, if it is not already turned on.

Teaching in Classrooms with a Variety of Developmental Levels

20 Nov

 

This video is part of a school consultation I did recently. I spent three days at the school, supporting teachers and therapists as they worked with students, talking to parents to help them understand DIR/Floortime, and generally helping everyone to make progress in their work in this developmental model. I take lots of video, and show it to the staff to give them the opportunity to be reflective about their work. I also sat down with staff and answered their questions for three hours at the end of the third day. I never speak from a script, and my answers to their questions were based in my understanding of their work, and my experiences and education. This clip is me answering a question from one of the teachers in the school, on the subject of providing appropriate instruction in a diverse classroom.

I suggest you use the Closed Captioning, turned on by clicking the cc on the video, if you have any difficulty understanding me. I sometimes speak very quickly.

This video is a little longer than my typical video because it is also on my website under “Consulting”, as an example of the services I provide when I consult to a school.

How We Inadvertently Create Aggression

12 Nov

I took about a year off of most social media. I wanted to clear my head of some of the “as-if” interventions I have seen in the last couple of years, and wanted to get back advocating for DIR/Floortime as a model of support for people of all ages with autism spectrum disorders. I am working on two different books, traveling a lot, consulting a lot, working in my private practice and working on the development of a not-for-profit.

Here is a short explanation of how we sometimes inadvertently create aggression in our children and the individuals with whom we work. The volunteer who comes up is my friend Hope from Oakwood Academy in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.

I recommend you put on the Closed Captioning by clicking on the little cc at the bottom of the video. I went through and corrected it, and since I talk quickly, it may really help to understand what I’m saying.

The Start Of Something Big!

30 Jan

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I am thrilled to announce that I am the Co-Head, and Clinical Director of a spectacular new school, Shrub Oak International School! It is a co-educational, boarding and day school located in the town of Shrub Oak in Westchester County, NY, on 127 acres of beautiful rolling fields and woods. For me, it is a dream come true!

I have traveled in this country and internationally over the last many years, and I have looked at all kinds of developmental programs for students with autism spectrum disorders, and I have seen what makes them work, and what makes them not work so well. I have noticed, again and again, that if all other things are equal, one of the factors that makes a program successful is ROOM, and lots of it! When a program does not have enough room, and students do not have access to nature, things do not go well. Shrub Oak has those things in abundance. Not that space is the only advantage, but if you don’t have space, if your students are crammed into small classrooms and you cannot get them outside to play in nature, you are in big trouble!

I am so excited to be able to take the beautiful campus, with it’s fields and forests, its Equestrian Center, its pool, and especially its organic farm (with my son Glenn as its steward) and use these spaces to supply sensible, effective developmental clinical programs, in the way I have always dreamed to supply them.

There are, of course, a million other things to say, like the ages of the students (middle school and high school), the number of students (390 boarding and day), the number of staff (about 600) and details about the amazing programs and curriculums. But, all of that will have to wait, and as you can imagine, I will be talking here a lot about the school’s development from now to opening in September, 2018.

For now, I just want to say how proud I am to be a part of this project, and how thrilled I am at being able to make my dream school a reality!

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Gil Talks about the Remarkable “Extremely Inconvenient Child”

21 Mar

This quick clip is from a training at the Rebecca School on 3/17/17. I brought up the subject of children who challenge us at the school, a concept I have come to call “The Extremely Inconvenient Child.” I do Not mean anything bad about the child, I am making the point that they challenge our way of doing things, point out our flaws, and show us where we need to improve.

Atlantic DIR/Floortime School Conference

8 Jan
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Petra Daitz, MS/ED far left, and Gil Tippy, PsyD second from the left

On Saturday, January 21st, 2017, I will be speaking at a very cool conference in Atlanta, put on by ICDL and the Community School, entitled 2017 Annual DIR® in Education Conference . Not an inspiring name, but some inspiring speakers! I will be talking about DIR/Floortime models for post-21 education, particularly a not-for-profit model I developed in CA, and its application nationally. Dave Nelson, the Executive Director of the Community School in Decatur, GA, is organizing the event and speaking, as is Emily Rubin, MS, CCC-SLP, who always teaches me a lot. I am particularly excited to have one of the great teachers from Rebecca School presenting, Petra Daitz, MS/ED, who will present her fantastic class, with lots of video. The conference promises to really make clear the school application of DIR/Floortime, and is in a beautiful space at The Atrium at the Cator Woolford Gardens at the Frazer Center in Atlanta. This is a great conference, focused on schools, in a beautiful, intimate setting. Seating is limited, but some seats are available! I hope to see you there.

2017 Annual DIR® in Education Conference
Frazer Center, Atlanta, Georgia
Saturday, January 21, 2017
9:00AM – 4:00PM

Parents are Natural Floortimers

19 Jul

I was at a national autism conference this week, and was reminded that DIR/Floortime is what parents want to do with their children, and that punishing, ignoring and rewarding with “skittles cut up so small it is amazing,” are not the things they wish to do. (And, the things they don’t want to do don’t work anyway!)

Gil on “Kids in the House” shares his opinion on DIR/Floortime VS. ABA

15 Jun

This is a clip from a panel I did on the website, “Kids in the House.” During the panel discussion, I got tossed a question about what intervention for Autism I would recommend. I don’t think they were prepared for how enthusiastically I would support DIR/Floortime and Stanley Greenspan. The other 2 panelists wanted to defend the ABA model. You can see the whole 30 minutes at the Kids in the House website through the link below. The part I posted actually gives you the whole idea, though.

If you come to see me at the Summer Autism Institute for the State of Vermont where I will be keynoting Friday, June 26th (http://www.uvm.edu/cnhs/autism_institute/) or Autism Society International Conference in Denver in July (http://www.uvm.edu/cnhs/autism_institute/) or at United States Autism and Aspergers Association in Tucson at the end of July (http://www.usautism.org/conferences/) you should probably know by know that I am going to talk about the parent supportive, respectful, effective DIR/Floortime and Rebecca School.

http://www.kidsinthehouse.com/blogs/kids-in-the-house/autism-discussion-raising-a-child-with-special-needs

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