Tag Archives: Floortime

US Autism Association Worldwide Watch Party Free Access (I’m presenting!)

22 Aug

In Defense of the Valiant Resistance

24 May

This is a video of a DIR/Floortime supervision I did for a clinician working in a clinic with a child who was turning his back, and doing everything he could to resist the clinician’s advances. She, the clinician, did a wonderful job, and has made tremendous progress in her support of the child’s developmental growth. Then, the therapist told me of the previous group of therapists who said that the child would never make progress, and suggested to the parents of the child that they should separate themselves from the child. This video is my response, in real time during my supervision with the clinician, to that suggestion.

Presenting at the US Autism Association 2021 World Autism Conference and Gala

12 Aug

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I am presenting at the US Autism Association’s 2021 World Autism Conference. This is a virtual conference, and I recorded presentations on two subjects close to my heart: Quality Autism Education, and DIR/Floortime. The first presentation on quality education is a discussion between the Executive Director of US Autism Association, Marlo Thurman and me, and the second, on DIR/Floortime is a panel discussion along with Stephen Shore, Robert Bernstein and Bridget Henn in the “Approaches to Autism” series.

Every year this conference has been a highlight for me, as I learn more at this conference than I do at any other conference I attend over the year. This year, because of health considerations, it is a virtual conference. The line-up of presenters is amazing, and I am honored to be invited to speak, not just once, but twice. The production values on all the presentations is of the highest quality, and I think you will find it a conference filled with presentations you will go back to again and again.

Here’s a little bit from the conference website:

“The US Autism Association is pleased to announce its 2021 World Conference and Gala. Within an entirely online model, this event will feature in-depth interviews, small group discussions, live chats with various speakers, and plenty of opportunities for live networking, connecting, and interacting with other conference attendees and sponsors.

In our continuing, 15-year tradition of bringing you the world’s best speakers, this event promises to maintain our small “family of support” feel to meet the needs of individuals at all ages along the autism spectrum. Recognized as one of the leading conferences that people on the autism spectrum want to attend, we at the US Autism Association hope you, your family and friends, and the medical, educational, and therapeutic professionals who serve those affected will join us and make this the best World Autism Conference and Gala yet!”

I hope you all enjoy watching as much as I enjoyed presenting!

 

Practical Floortime Consulting

3 Aug

Here is a quick video of me doing a consult to a clinic in another country. I listened to the clinician as she presented the child’s complex sensory profile, and outlined his pressing need. The government had supported his getting cochlear implants, and because he had not yet made great progress, the child was in danger of losing the government’s support for those implants. So, I made up a couple of interventions, supporting the child’s sensory challenges, and supporting the child’s speech production. I also made sure the intervention was joyful, so that both the child and the clinician would want to continue.

Gil on the “Affect Autism” Podcast

2 Feb

This week I’m in a discussion with my friend Daria at “Affect Autism.” She saw my presentation at a conference recently on the topic, “Good Autism Education is Just Good Education, and she wanted me to do a video interview and a podcast on that subject. You can hear or see the entire thing by clicking on the hyperlink above. In the five minute clip above, Daria Brown suggests that the educational system is geared to educate the 95% of the students in the middle of the “bell curve”, or normal distribution of students, and that is why it doesn’t serve students with developmental challenges well. I disagree, and the above is my answer and explanation.

“For On The Floor” #4, Folding Laundry

26 Mar

In this video I offer my very latest thinking on Next/Gen developmental education while folding laundry. In about 4 minutes, I try to teach a fundamental principle for developmental interventions. It is a sophisticated lesson that I would only teach to the most advanced DIRFloortime® practitioners, or parents, who are the experts on their child.

How a Behavioral Intervention Might Impede Progress in Autism

11 Dec

This is part of a presentation I gave at theInterdisciplinary Counsel for Development and Learning, ICDL’s, International Conference in San Francisco this year. In it I explain why punishing, or prompting or working behaviorally in general, sets back the development of the person on the receiving end of the intervention. I explain in detail a graph I use to teach therapists and families why they should not mix an applied behavioral intervention with a DIRFloortime® intervention.

The “Glinda Strategy”

3 Dec

 

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This is a brief clip, from the end of my presentation at the Interdisciplinary Council for Development and Learning’s 2019 International Conference in San Francisco. It starts on a slide of a chapter I just published in the book, “Autism 360°.”

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I wanted to empower therapists and parents to advocate vigorously whenever they see people misrepresenting which interventions have rigorous data over a long time that supports their interventions. I called it “The Glinda Strategy” in honor of everyone’s favorite good witch, Glinda, from the”Wizard of Oz.” Click on the cc at the bottom of the video to turn on the Closed Captioning, if it is not already turned on.

Teaching in Classrooms with a Variety of Developmental Levels

20 Nov

 

This video is part of a school consultation I did recently. I spent three days at the school, supporting teachers and therapists as they worked with students, talking to parents to help them understand DIR/Floortime, and generally helping everyone to make progress in their work in this developmental model. I take lots of video, and show it to the staff to give them the opportunity to be reflective about their work. I also sat down with staff and answered their questions for three hours at the end of the third day. I never speak from a script, and my answers to their questions were based in my understanding of their work, and my experiences and education. This clip is me answering a question from one of the teachers in the school, on the subject of providing appropriate instruction in a diverse classroom.

I suggest you use the Closed Captioning, turned on by clicking the cc on the video, if you have any difficulty understanding me. I sometimes speak very quickly.

This video is a little longer than my typical video because it is also on my website under “Consulting”, as an example of the services I provide when I consult to a school.

How We Inadvertently Create Aggression

12 Nov

I took about a year off of most social media. I wanted to clear my head of some of the “as-if” interventions I have seen in the last couple of years, and wanted to get back advocating for DIR/Floortime as a model of support for people of all ages with autism spectrum disorders. I am working on two different books, traveling a lot, consulting a lot, working in my private practice and working on the development of a not-for-profit.

Here is a short explanation of how we sometimes inadvertently create aggression in our children and the individuals with whom we work. The volunteer who comes up is my friend Hope from Oakwood Academy in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.

I recommend you put on the Closed Captioning by clicking on the little cc at the bottom of the video. I went through and corrected it, and since I talk quickly, it may really help to understand what I’m saying.

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