Respecting Autism Conference at Middlebury College

3 Oct
The panel at Respecting Autism, Sept. 27th

The panel at Respecting Autism, Sept. 27th

At the Rebecca School, we are still on a high, after the amazing┬áconference, “Respecting Autism“, we gave at Middlebury College on September 27th. In conjunction with the Sapphire Center, a very cool local center for kids with

Petra Daitz answers questions from an audience member

Petra Daitz answers questions from an audience member

developmental challenges that is doing DIR/Floortime, volunteer staff from the Rebecca School presented a full day conference on what Floortime looks like in a school setting, when it is done well.

Stacey Hensel talking about Music Therapy

Stacey Hensel talking about Music Therapy

Presentations on Parent Support, Visual Spatial support, Floortime with a group of challenging students, Lunchtime Speech and Language programing, our Cafe Rebecca Program, our Music Therapy program, a panel discussion with all of us, and my keynote on the importance of thinking. It was an amazing day!

Yummy Cafe Rebecca cookies at the conference

Yummy Cafe Rebecca cookies at the conference

Here is the good news! We recorded the entire thing! Our amazing Creative Services director, Billy Gomberg, worked tirelessly all day, and as a result, we will be able to offer the entire conference, the very best of Floortime

Meghan Collins talks about visual/spatial support

Meghan Collins talks about visual/spatial support

in the school setting, to everyone, for free! Through the generosity of Tina McCourt, the Program Director of the Rebecca School, we will be able o put all the presentations on-line. So, if you were unable to make it to Middlebury on September 27th,

Lunch alfresco at Middlebury

Lunch alfresco at Middlebury

you will be able to see the whole thing, on-line. Watch this space, because as soon as we have the material edited, and the server space set up, we will let you know.

It was a great day!

Gil and Christopher Gauthier at United States Autism and Asperger National Conference

6 Sep

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Hope some of you got to see the amazing Christopher Gauthier and me streaming live from the United States Autism and Asperger Association national conference. Here we are on stage, after the presentation, in front of some of Christopher’s Photographs from his Facing Autism project. You can access that here http://www.christophergauthier.com/ , or you can follow the link to it from my home page http://www.drgiltippy.com . We had an amazing day here in Kansas City. Wish you were here to see it.

The Common Core Standards are Right, and RTI Won’t Work

14 Jul

 

This is part of a presentation I gave with my friend, Rae Leeper, at the YAI International Convention in NYC this year. The Common Core Curriculum is the right way to go for all kids, and especially for kids with developmental challenges of relating and communicating. The way behaviorists work with these kids, Response to Intervention (RTI) worked alright with the memory based No Child Left Behind, (which left everyone behind), but does not work at all with the Common Core Standards. Behaviorists are left doing an ineffective intervention faster and faster to try to meet the Common Core Standards, but they cannot do it. I predict that in two years everyone will be clamoring to do our brand of respectful, developmental, individualized, child centered intervention and teaching.

Dr. Tippy Won’t Do That

19 Jun

 

This is little piece of a case conference I ran at the Rebecca School a couple of weeks ago. These weekly conferences include the team working with the child, the parents, and the entire 120 person staff of the school. The team talks about their program and the rest of the staff and I offer suggestions to make the program better. This clip is me talking about a child who loves the tiny details of a small locking block set, and a particular type of train set, and how he can see the trees but not the forest. I tell the staff to throw out all the tiny detailed stuff in order to invite the child into the world. I also talk about the tiny frustrations that lead to every child, not neurotypical and neurotypical alike, to be able to tolerate frustration and the challenges of the everyday world. Children beginning to understand that they have the inner resources to handle challenges is what leads to children seeing challenges as interesting problems to be solved, as opposed to seeing them as insurmountable frustrations to be controlled by rigidly sticking to set patterns.

ABA Detox, Part 5

28 May

 

This is Part 5 of a lecture I gave at Rebecca School about ABA Detox, the term we coined to talk about the difficulties children who have had a lot of ABA treatment sometimes have when they get into a respectful, appropriate developmental setting. I get a chance to talk briefly about language, and when children start talking as they move up developmentally. It is touching to me, that when I pause in the lecture and turn to the audience, that they all know that there are three words every parent wants to hear from their child.

ABA Detox, Part 4

9 May

 

This is part 4 of a lecture I gave at the Rebecca School in which I talked about the detox from applied behavior analytic treatment. The difficulty thinking that we see in kids is the side effect of a commonly applied treatment. Behavioral, memory based education, for any kid, causes trouble thinking. This is why the Common Core Standards are causing such troubles. They are thinking based standards, and are in fact what we need to teach, but our entire education system, for kids neurotypical, and neurodiverse, has been wrong-headedly memory and behaviorally based. ABA treatment causes problems for kids who get it, and this lecture, with my Pop Corn Treatment suggestion, talks about one way in which we try to help kids find their thinking selves.

ABA Detox, Part 3

5 May

This is part three of a lecture I gave at the Rebecca School talking about “ABA Detox.” This is the process of moving from a world where you are told what to do at every minute, to a world where people respect your thought and your intention, and give you some freedom. Kids in this circumstance have trouble even recognizing that they have a thought, never mind that they have a right to act on the thought!

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